Facility Agreement signing ceremony with Republic of Armenia

HE Mr. Arman Kirakossian, Permanent Representative of Armenia (left) and CTBTO Executive Secretary Lassina Zerbo (right)

CTBTO concludes Facility Agreement with Armenia

His Excellency Mr. Arman Kirakossian, Permanent Representative of Armenia to the United Nations and CTBTO Executive Secretary Lassina Zerbo conclude the Facility Agreement signing ceremony in Vienna, Austria.

7 September 2016, Vienna, Austria

The government of Armenia and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) have concluded a Facility Agreement regarding an auxiliary seismic station in Garni (AS003).

The Facility Agreement was signed by Executive Secretary Lassina Zerbo and His Excellency Mr. Arman Kirakossian, Permanent Representative of Armenia to the United Nations, on 7 September 2016 in Vienna.
 
Facility Agreements lay the political, legal and technical basis for cooperation on all issues related to the establishment and maintenance of an International Monitoring System (IMS) station that may arise between the host country and the CTBTO. This includes the transfer of ownership for the station, arrangements with local station operators, assistance with import of spare parts and physical security of the station.
 
In addition to enhancing IMS coverage in the region and globally, data from this seismic station can be used for civil and scientific uses, for example for studying the Earth’s structure or reporting the location and magnitude of earthquakes.
 
AS003 is one of 120 auxiliary seismic stations foreseen by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Treaty calls for two global seismic monitoring networks: a primary seismic network with 50 stations and an auxiliary one with 120 stations. The stations of the primary seismic network send data continuously in real time to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, while auxiliary stations send data upon request. Together, the seismic networks form the backbone of the IMS which monitors the earth 24/7 for signs of nuclear explosions.